Is Your ISP Getting Ready?

I know that, so far, mine is not. In fact, from what they’ve told me several times over the last year, they have no plans to get ready at all. This makes no more sense to me than handing a bottle of diet pills to an anorexic. It is a just plain bad idea and sooner or later everybody involved is going to regret it.

What am I talking about?

Only a few weeks ago IANA handed out the last five /8 blocks of IPV4 addresses to the RIRs. This means that sometime over the next year or so those addresses are going to run out. When they do, ISPs, Businesses, Governments and so on will have to have implemented IPV6 with is the successor to IPV4 or there WILL be connection problems.

ISPs that choose to keep their customers on IPV4 and simply implement a gateway to IPV6 are going to quickly find a lot of dissatisfied customers when those customers find out that working through that gateway is not the same as connecting directly like they should.

So. Is your ISP getting ready? Call them and ask. Keep asking until they have a good answer.

[tags]ipv4, ipv6, ip address, ip address supply, implement ipv6[/tags]

Most Facebook Social Network Users Complacent About Terms Of Service

I’m sure that most people have at least heard about the recent Consumerist article about changes that the Facebook social network made to it’s terms of service that essentially meant that Facebook owned all data, images, Etc that users put on their Facebook pages and that it generated quite a bit of backlash.

I’m sure that most people have at least heard about the recent Consumerist article about changes that the Facebook social network made to it’s terms of service that essentially meant that Facebook owned all data, images, Etc that users put on their Facebook pages and that it generated quite a bit of backlash.

While Facebook did eventually go back to their original terms, It’s surprising that there weren’t more people expressing concern about how their new terms of service were going to be written. It seems to be pretty obvious that most Facebook users only care after Facebook goes over the line and until they do, the overwhelming majority of their users couldn’t care less about what the terms of service said. And then only because the people that really do care made it a point to get intensely vocal about the change in the terms of service, expressing their dislike for that change to Facebook and anyone else that would listen.

I read thatFacebook actually took the unusual step of promoting a “Facebook Town Hall: Proposed Facebook Principles” group on their homepage yet, in spite of that, less than 10,000 people joined. Another Facebook Town Hall about the “Proposed Statement of Rights & Responsibilities” has had something like just over 9,000 people join. Given that there are more than 180 million Facebook users, the impact of the current responses to their new terms isn’t what you’d call substantial by any stretch.

The obvious problem with this is that If response remains this low, there’s every chance that users are not going to have very much effect on what the new terms end up being. So if you’re one of that 180 Million plus Facebook users, it’s probably a good idea if you pay closer attention to their terms of service and watch for those town hall groups and make your voice known. It’s kinda like voting, if you have the opportunity to participate and don’t, you have no place to stand and disagree with the results.

[Tags]facebook terms, facebook social network, web 2.0 social, web 2.0, personal data images, twon hall groups, social network, facebook users, overwhelming majority, backlash, town hall, Dislike, 10000 People[/tags]

CNN Shares With Your Bandwidth

Are you one of the millions of people who watched the live video stream on CNN’s website of Obama’s inauguration on Jan. 20? If you are, then it’s very likely that your computer and your bandwidth was probably used without your direct knowledge to send that video to other people who were watching it.

Are you one of the millions of people who watched the live video stream on CNN’s website of Obama’s inauguration on Jan. 20? If you are, then it’s very likely that your computer and your bandwidth was probably used without your direct knowledge to send that video to other people who were watching it.

According to a story on Windows Secrets, CNN has started using a P2P app called “Octoshape Grid Delivery”. Apparently, the first time you try to watch a live video feed the flash player informs you that the Octoshape Grid Delivery add on for Adobe’s flash player is required in order to get the feed.

octoshape install

The truth of the matter is that you don’t need Octoshape to watch those feeds. On the lower right corner of the playback window are links for using the normal Adobe flash player or Windows Media Player to watch the feed. They’re just saying it’s “required” because they want as many people as possible to get with the Octoshape program.

Essentially CNN end up using your bandwidth for it’s purposes (without paying you for it I might add!). As you might expect, this plays havoc with your available bandwidth. Octoshape grabs any where from 320 to as much as 600 kilobits per second of your upstream bandwidth. This can make a major dent in your total available bandwidth and I don’t doubt that it’d slow a lot of other connections down in the process.

This is bad enough for a single user setup but then there’s the growing number of people that are connecting two or more computers to their router. On one machine somebody’s looking over some websites for ideas for their next Orlando vacations and then on another machine using the same connection somebody starts watching one of those Octoshape aware CNN things and the 1st person suddenly might think about taking a vacation or at least a nap while their pages load.

What’s really sneaky about it is that the fact that it’s going to take over a big chunk of your pc’s resources and internet bandwidth isn’t made clear up front. Instead it’s written in legalese and hidden in the license agreement (you know, the one’s that hardly anyone reads on account of how convoluted they are.) and you don’t get to see it until after you have to click yes or no to install it.

There’s a lot more on the Windows Secrets site and it’s very much well worth reading. Suffice it to say that in MY opinion, if you get a dialog box asking if you want to install Octoshape, Click NO just as fast as you can.

[tags]octoshape grid delivery, octoshape flash, flash add on, cnn, p2p, evil p2p, deceptive license, bandwidth, bandwidth hog, just say no[/tags]

Network Neutrality Still An Issue

In recent months I haven’t seen nearly as much talk about network neutrality, what it means to average users, what telephone companies and large ISPs want to do with the Internet and perhaps most importantly, what Washington and our newly elected president intend to actually DO about it.

In recent months I haven’t seen nearly as much talk about network neutrality, what it means to average users, what telephone companies and large ISPs want to do with the Internet and perhaps most importantly, what Washington and our newly elected president intend to actually DO about it.

This does not change the fact that it’s still a VERY important issue, one that every person using the internet needs to be aware of. It’s something that we all need to be getting after our senators and congressional representatives to support. It’s something that we need to make absolutely certain that all ISPs, both large and small, understand that the Internet is something that is intended to be a level playing field that allows anyone to publish or receive information in whatever form.

If network neutrality is not mandated and enforced, then eventually “big content” will be the only source of most (if not all) of the content online. The ability and freedom of anyone to publish whatever will be sharply curtailed. Just as it was with radio so long ago.

This video is perhaps one of the best explanations of the network neutrality issue and what it means to the Joe Sixpacks of the internet using world. It’s something over ten minutes long but absolutely well worth the watching. I strongly recommend that everybody watch this video at least once. Once you’ve watched it, share it with your friends and family, anyone who doesn’t have a clear idea what network neutrality is and why it’s so important.

[Tags]video explanation, explain net neutrality, network neutrality, congressional representatives, net neutrality issue, telephone companies, isp, explanations, senators, freedom, radio, level playing field, tell friends, tell family, video[/tags]

FCC Considering Free Internet For USA

Anyway, in getting caught up I ran across an interesting bit that came from the Wall Street Journal. Apparently the FCC is
thinking about doing something right for once.

Once again I’ve gotten behind on my Slashdot reading (that does tend to keep happening doesn’t it?

Anyway, in getting caught up I ran across an interesting bit that came from the Wall Street Journal. Apparently the FCC is
thinking about doing something right for once.

The article says that they are considering a plan to provide free wireless internet across the country. It also says that the plan would involve some level of filtering and while that won’t sit well with the younger folks, adults would probably (?!?) be allowed to opt out of the filtering. While I think that filtering the Internet is about as useful as putting a truckload of air o swiss humidifiers in the same tightly sealed room with an equal number of DE-humidifiers because determined people will find a way around the filters, I do have to admit that I like the idea of nationwide free wi-fi.

The trick is finding a way to make such a system work. Several cities have tried municipal wi-fi with little to no success because of the cost in maintaining it and paying for bandwidth.

I guess time will tell.

[Tags]fcc, free wi-fi, nationwide wi-fi, free wireless internet[/tags]